from A dying colonialism

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Fanon

What he would try to do, on the contrary, would be to convert the family. The militant [in him] would replace the son and undertake to indoctrinate the father. But it would not be the son’s words that would convince him. It would be, more than anything, the dimensions of the people’s commitment, the information received as to the repression. The old paternal assurance, already shaken, would collapse once and for all. The father no longer knew how to keep his balance. He would then discover that the only way to do it was to join his son. It was during this period that the father buried the old values and decided to follow along on the new path.

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